Connecticut couple renovate school bus into a tiny home put

Connecticut couple renovate school bus into a tiny home put – Talktalk News

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A couple who purchased a 25-foot-long bus and spent two and a half years transforming it into their tiny dream home on wheels have decided to sell it for nearly $80,000. 

Joe and Holly Whiting, from Connecticut, purchased the school bus in 2018 for just $14,000, after nearly three years and $65,000 in renovations, the couple finally built their perfect home on wheels, which includes solar panels and plenty of storage space. 

After nearly a year of living in the 105-square-foot home, the nomads have decided to sell it to downsize to a van that’s easier to park to be close to their family.

Joe and Holly Whiting, from Connecticut, purchased a school bus in 2018 for just $14,000 and renovated it for nearly three years to transform it into their perfect tiny home on wheels 

Inside the bus, the couple added two vibrant red benches for relaxing, a queen sized bed, plenty of storage space and RV style windows and a skylight that’ll make sure ‘you never feel closed in’

The couple (shown above) purchased the 25-foot-long bus after retiring from their jobs as teachers and painters to live an off-grid lifestyle and transformed the school bus into the perfect tiny home on wheels

The Whitings had always talked about becoming traveling nomads but decided to take the plunge in 2018 and bought the bus (pictured left before renovations); They renovated the bus for two and a half years (pictured right during renovations)

The Whitings had always talked about becoming traveling nomads but decided to take the plunge in 2018. Once Joe retired from his job as a teacher and Holly retired from her job as a painter, the two purchased the school bus, a 2005 Thomas FS65, also known as a skoolie, from a Texas nursery school in December 2018. 

According to the couple’s blog about their tiny home adventures called, A Bus Named Sandy, prior to them purchasing the bus it was used as a government vehicle at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. After that, the bus shuttled nursery schoolers in Texas until Joe and Holly came along. 

The couple wanted to live an off-grid lifestyle and wanted to make sure they transformed their bus to match. 

They began by installing solar energy, propane and water tanks and lots of storage space. 

They also used both bought and recycled materials to give their home on wheels a vibrant and unique feel. 

The Whitings then welded the original two hinge doors together to make one door to match the door frame of a typical house. 

Holly then used her painting skills on the entry stairway to help them resemble a wood finish and add a more welcoming touch to the bus. 

When guests walk up the stairs they’ll see storage shelves on either side of the driver and passenger seats that hold shoes, pens and other essentials.

The home comes complete with a full kitchen and the kitchen counter is made of sturdy heart pine, and sits atop bright green cabinets made from reclaimed wood from a tobacco barn and leather handles made from a thrifted belt

Inside the bus, there are two vibrant red benches for relaxing, a queen sized bed, plenty of storage space and RV style windows and a skylight that’ll make sure ‘you never feel closed in’

On the right side, just past the driver’s seat, there is a bathroom with a small shower inside that is closed off by a teal curtain and covered in copper sheeting and pebble tile backsplash with silver finishes

For their unique home, the couple wanted unique décor and also used mostly recycled materials and décor made by friends and family including the dolls made by Joe’s mom 

Above the windshield, Joe even built a book shelf that measures 33 inches and holds all of their favorite books for long road trips. 

On the right side, just past the driver’s seat, there is a shower and toilet covered in copper sheeting and pebble tile backsplash. 

The couple made sure to make of every inch of their home on wheels and even added a hidden storage space above the bathroom. 

The hidden storage area sticks out just over the driver’s head, and they use it to store bathroom and cleaning supplies. 

And with another hidden cabinet with 120-volt power functions that acts as a secret space to charge their phones, the couple hasn’t gone completely off the grid just yet. 

Thanks to the couple’s knack for organizing, there is ultimately no space left unused in their tiny home. 

From hidden cabinets to storage shelves and pull-out drawers, the Whitings made sure every space was occupied and added if there’s a spare space they’ll put a drawer there.   

Across from the bathroom there is a full kitchen complete with a stove, oven, sink and fridge. 

The kitchen counter is made of sturdy heart pine, and sits atop bright green cabinets made from reclaimed wood from a tobacco barn and leather handles made from a thrifted belt. 

Behind the counter there sits an modern oven, fridge and a sink made out of composite granite. 

Underneath the counter, Joe and Holly built even more hidden pull-out drawers, which they use to store board games and Holly’s art supplies. 

Both Holly and Joe helped renovate the bus, while Holly painted, Joe drilled and the two completed the renovations in two and a half years 

Outside, the couple installed solar panels, a cedar roof rack for even more storage and a skylight; the Whitings also used recycled materials to give the bus a unique touch

To help make the buss resemble a home, they added plenty of storage space, even underneath the kitchen counter and welded the two original doors together and gave it a wood finish 

Despite the 105-square-foot bus making the perfect home for the Whitings, they have decided to sell it to someone who loves adventure and knows what it takes to live in a bus

Past the kitchen and the bathroom, the Whiting added plenty of space for seating. 

Towards the back of the bus, the couple added two benches that face each other and can comfortably fit four or five people, the Whitings use their vibrant red benches for relaxing and dining.  

According to the listing, you’ll ‘nerve feel closed in,’ with large RV style windows that go across the walls and sit behind the benches, to to make the bus bright and welcoming, and added a skylight. 

In between the benches, the nomads added a wooden pull out table, which easily transforms their seating area into a dining area and allows them to serve four or five people. 

At the very back of a bus, there is 60 inch queen bed that sleeps both Joe and Holly comfortably and overheard cabinet space for reading lights and USB charging ports. 

Under the bed, the couple keeps batteries, a water heater, power tools, solar panels and a 75-gallon water tank. 

The Whitings even used utilized the outside of the bus by adding a cedar roof rack with a waterproof bag filled with outdoor supplies and a 24 inch storage box, used to hold other essentials, including the wastewater tank. 

Joe and Holly finished their custom home in 2021 and hit the road, living ‘happily’ parked with ‘no one for miles around.’ 

Despite loving their custom home, the pair decided to sell the bus in hopes of downsizing to a van to be closer to their daughter who just had a bay. 

The Whitings hope for a buyer who will put as much love into the bus they call Sandy as they have and will only sell their home on wheels to someone who loves adventure and is willing to do the work it takes to live in a bus. 

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